May 23, 2012 0 Share

Moving and Multitasking


Stressed young couple with moving boxes and sign saying "We're Moving."
iStockphoto

As you know, we've got a baby on the way. (As of now, we don't yet know whether it's a son or a daughter.)

For that reason, we've bought a house, and we're moving in stages.

Now, I've moved many a time. In fact, ever since leaving my parents' home for the first time to go to college, I have never hung my hat in the same place for three years at a stretch. (In fact, as of four years ago I hadn't even lived in the same place for two years consecutively!) And Emily and I have moved together a couple of times already.

This is the Big One. We're now moving a houseful of stuff.

And what's more, we may be there for not two or three years, but an order of magnitude more. Kind of puts a new light on neighbor-to-neighbor relationships. (Especially since I'm the one who will be there the lion's share of the time.)

Meanwhile, I'm resisting being overwhelmed by the process. Our landlady has been nice enough to give me a list of the various specific things she needs done before we leave.

And, I've learned bit by bit to make multi-day plans of what to do and when.

For example, Monday morning, clean out the den. That afternoon, load up the car with extra clothes, then drive down to the new house and put them away.

Tuesday morning, clear away the books and papers so prospective tenants can come see the place.

Tuesday afternoon, load many of said books and papers into the car, drive up to the new house and put them all away.

I'm managing this mainly myself, since Emily is super-busy at the office. (Not to mention she's devoting all her remaining energy to her work since our baby is taking up much of said energy.)

And of course there are the annoying little details of moving. Such as changing addresses, reserving a U-Haul, arranging for moving helpers.

BTW, moving itself doesn't especially bother me as an Aspie. I'm used to that kind of change and I always have at least a bit of advance warning.

Some things are annoying to most people. Some things can be particularly overwhelming to Aspies because we have to decide what needs to get done, and how much of it needs to get done by when.

Especially with all the interconnections. If I drive down to the house with all the books on Monday and Tuesday, that means I need to ask prospective tenants to come on Wednesday instead. Meanwhile, the more I manage to take up to the house in advance, the smaller a truck we'll need and the more likely we can find one we can use on shorter notice. That in turn means we (the editorial we!) can use a bit more time in other preparations.

When everything is bound up with everything else, we need to handle multiple things at once, and think several moves ahead. And like handling change and taking initiative, these are sometimes exhausting but necessary skills.